New stamp marks centennial of women’s suffrage in Canada

 

 

 

CPC-suffrage.01_670

On 28 January 1916, Manitoba became the first province to extend the right to vote to women. The suffrage movement was led, predominantly, by Nellie McClung, who famously asked the legislature: “Have we not the brains to think? Hands to work? Hearts to feel? And lives to live? Do we not bear our part in citizenship? Do we not help build the Empire? Give us our due!.” McClung’s vivacious personality was critical to earning the necessary public support to pressure government to extending the vote.

The stamp was designed by Tétro Design, with creative consultation from veteran stamp designer Robert L. Peters, and with direction from Canada Post. (Prior to a merger with Tétro Design in 2014, Peters ran Circle Design Incorporated, a studio founded in 1976 that designed dozens of Canadian stamps). During the design research phase, Tétro met with the Nellie McClung Foundation and Manitoba Museum to review the extensive historical artifacts and information housed here in Manitoba.

Illustrated in black and gold, the traditional colours of the women’s suffrage movement in North America, the stamp incorporates the Venus symbol of femininity as the letters ‘O’ and ‘T’ in the word ‘Vote.’ To the right, text in English and French highlights the theme of women’s suffrage and indicates the dates of this important centennial.

“A crux issue when designing stamps in Canada is the requirement for all text to appear in ‘equal billing’ in both English and French — a real challenge when given such a small piece of real estate. The fact that the word ‘Vote’ is the same in both official languages signaled the conceptual solution in this case,” said Peters. “Astute observers may also catch the tongue-in-cheek homage to Robert Indiana’s ‘LOVE’ pop art sculpture.”

“’Vote’ is a powerful word. As both noun and verb, it represents an undeniable call to action,” said Andrea Tetrault, partner at Tétro Design. “The ligature of the ’o’ and ’t’ form the Venus symbol, transforming the word into a simple and elegant pictograph symbolizing votes for women.”

The stamps are being released in the form of booklets (140,000 in total) containing 10 permanent domestic stamps and are available as of 8 March 2016 at postal outlets across Canada. A historically-significant collectible Official First Day Cover (produced in a quantity of 9000) bears a stamp with a pictorial cancellation depicting a marked ballot entering a ballot box; it is also available through select outlets as of 8 March 2016, and can be purchased online via Canada Post.

 

A postage stamp reflecting the women’s suffrage movement led by Nellie McClung has the markings of a Winnipeg design firm.

Canada Post has released the stamp with the visual stylings of Tétro Design. The stamp, illustrated in black and gold, comes after creative consultation from veteran stamp designer Robert L. Peters, and direction from Susan Gilson, Canada Post’s manager of design and production of stamp services.

“A crux issue when designing stamps in Canada is the requirement for all text to appear in ‘equal billing’ in both English and French — a real challenge when given such a small piece of real estate,” said Peters.

“The fact that the word ‘Vote’ is the same in both official languages signaled the conceptual solution in this case.”

The stamps are being released in the form of booklets (140,000 in total) containing 10 permanent domestic stamps and are available as of today at postal outlets across Canada. Via chrisd.ca

womensSuffrage_stamp

 

Tétro Design in Winnipeg created the artwork for this women’s suffrage stamp. (Tétro Design)

 

https://www.canadapost.ca/web/en/blogs/announcements/details.page?article=2016/03/08/new_stamp_marks_cent&cattype=announcements&cat=newsreleases

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